Corning murals

Julie R. Johnson/Corning Observer

One of two murals, this one located at 1215 Solano St., near Rodgers Theater, is based on four animals, a bear, a fox, salmon, and a woodpecker. Professional muralists from Sacramento, Berkeley, San Jose, and Tacoma, Washington, honor the legacy of the Paskenta Band of Nomlaki Indians.

The Paskenta Band of Nomlaki Indians, through the Paskenta Nomlaki Foundation, unveiled two murals dedicated to celebrating the essence of the Tribe's legacy and culture, creating a unique experience that engages and inspires the community to increase the appreciation for the arts.

Bringing together tribal members and professional artists over several days, the foundation hosted a live mural painting event on Saturday, May 22.

Through the event the Tribe has the opportunity to tell its story, while creating a unique experience that engaged and inspires the community to increase the appreciation for the arts. In addition, the murals further beautify the historic Solano Street in Corning, said Tribe Chairman Andrew “Dru” Alejandro.

The first mural, located at 1120 Solano St., will honor the legacy and culture of the first people of this area, the Paskenta Band of Nomlaki Indians. The Tribe has come together with Urbanists Collective, a community-based arts organization, to design a mural that includes culturally relevant designs and imagery, such as Northern Flicker Birds and Nomlaki Basket designs interwoven with an image of a matriarch wrapped in a blanket. The colors and art style are contemporary and unique, highlighting the past, present and future.

The second mural, located at 1215 Solano St., near Rodgers Theater, is based on four animals, a bear, a fox, salmon, and a woodpecker. Professional muralists from Sacramento, Berkeley, San Jose, and Tacoma, Washington will each paint an animal, bringing their own unique style to the theme.

The Paskenta Nomlaki Foundation has remained committed to supporting efforts that encourage the community to pursue the arts, obtain higher education and improve the well-being of the tribe and surrounding communities to develop the quality of life in the region.

Residents from the Corning and surrounding communities are welcome to stop by to see the live mural paintings and to learn more about the Tribe's efforts to elevate the arts and creativity in the community.

The Paskenta Band of Nomlaki Indians owns Rolling Hills Casino and Resort, which includes the Casino, restaurants, two conference centers, a brewery and sistillery, RV Park and Travel Center, The Equestrian Center at Rolling Hills and The Links at Rolling Hills Golf Course.

The Paskenta Nomlaki Foundation donates generously to community organizations each year, with over $9 million donated to benefit local health, safety and education programs.

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