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The record of the 2019 legislative session –Gov. Gavin Newsom’s first –is still a work in progress, but his signature on Assembly Bill 392 this week makes it a success, no matter what else happens.

Desalination began to lose its urgency among Californians and their public officials two years ago, after the drought-busting winter of 2016-17, when heavy rain and snow ended dry conditions in most of the state.

... So I shall stick by one thing in life that made me very proud: I was once a Boy Scout and the Scout Law is like the Magna Carta or the Ancient Knights. I shall not ever lie and how proud I am that I can say that I would rather be known as an honest, decent man, rather than the rich man in town.

As the elected leader of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 1245, which represents approximately 12,000 frontline utility workers at Pacific Gas & Electric Co., I have paid careful attention both to legislative activity in Sacramento and to PG&E’s bankruptcy pr…

Last month I had the honor of attending the Defense Communities National Summit in Washington, D.C., with my fellow Yuba County Supervisor, Andy Vasquez. We joined more than 800 of our country’s leaders, defense experts and decision makers to discuss what we, as a community with a military b…

The state budget package that Democratic legislators and Gov. Gavin Newsom just enacted is sprinkled with billions of dollars in extra goodies for their most important political constituency, labor unions.

For decades – close to a century, in fact – America’s educators and politicians have argued furiously over how best to teach children to read, pitting advocates of “phonics” against those of “whole language,” a conflict dubbed “reading wars.”

From the ashes of last year’s huge fires in Butte, Shasta, Lake and Los Angeles counties, this state’s utilities have suddenly acquired vast new powers to control and influence the lives of millions of Californians.

The careers of political executives – presidents, governors and big city mayors – are often, fairly or not, defined by how they deal with the crises they encounter.

Until now, the California Public Utilities Commission has appeared to work responsibly at minimizing future wildfire risks in this thoroughly singed state, certifying new safety plans from electric companies it regulates and imposing a few fines where the big utilities have been found negligent.

Given their druthers, many government officials would prefer to do their business – our business, actually – behind closed doors and provide sanitized, self-serving versions of their actions after the fact.

California’s political leaders, Democrats all, are touting a new state budget that expands spending on services for the state’s poor while building reserves.

The state Department of Finance reported this month that California, which has a stubborn and growing shortage of housing, added just 77,000 houses, apartments and condos in 2018.

It’s pretty clear to anyone who’s watched firefighters try to control the massive blazes bedeviling California over the last two years that they have the right stuff. But questions have arisen over whether they are using all the right stuff.

Gavin Newsom’s election as governor and the expanded Democratic Party majorities in the Legislature have raised hopes in some quarters and fears in others that big tax increases may be on the horizon.

In response to Russia’s efforts to meddle in the 2016 Presidential Elections, Facebook is requiring more information on individuals who are paying for advertising content on their social media platform. Not only will this new application ensure greater transparency during the election season…

In June, Yuba Sutter Arts began the process of helping to create a master cultural plan for Yuba-Sutter by hosting a series of monthly meetings with local arts and culture leaders and the general public. Participation and input from a broad cross section of the community has been excellent a…

Naturalization ceremonies are joyous events. They’re an occasion for new citizens – many of whom are longtime U.S. residents – to officially declare the United States as their home. They’re also a reminder that it is not birthplace or ethnicity that makes one an American, but a commitment to…

For decades, fueled by fear-mongering labels like “a generation of super-predators,” the United States turned to an ever-increasing reliance on adult-like prisons as the go-to response when young people break the law. This overreliance on incarceration resulted in an explosion in the number …

We have enough issues to deal with in the world, so it’s unfortunate to have to take time to write this, but I feel compelled to address the claims in the anonymous “resistance” op-ed published this week in the New York Times. The author might think he or she is doing a service to the countr…

In 2017, as Lynn Novick and I were finishing our film on the Vietnam War, I called Sen. John McCain to see if I could stop by his office and show some clips to him. He agreed, and when I asked if there were any sections of the 18-hour film that he’d particularly like to see, McCain said “the…

Cultural planning is a place-based process that generates a vision and action plan for strengthening and growing arts and cultural assets. The planning process provides an opportunity for our region to expand and enhance artistic and cultural opportunities for the broader community and visit…

As the fall election season begins officially this week, it’s high time to look closely at what a Gov. Gavin Newsom might be like.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ description of college students as “sanctimonious, sensitive, supercilious snowflakes” might just be the best example of alliteration from a government official since Vice President Spiro Agnew called the news media “nattering nabobs of negativism.”

One hour. Two hours. Three hours. Four in line. Standing. Waiting. By now, it’s mid-afternoon, you’re still waiting in line at the DMV office. Exhausted. Tired. Hungry. Thirsty. Phone battery drained. You reach the front of this line – only to learn that this was simply to pull a ticket for …

No state has been more visible than California in resisting the environmental policies of President Trump, filing 38 lawsuits by the beginning of this month. Now the state’s massive early fire season is demonstrating the merit of those legal actions.

Over the last year, I’ve seen a growing number of comparisons between the current overdose crisis and the height of the HIV/AIDS epidemic three decades ago. The parallels are certainly striking: an escalating number of deaths, particularly among younger people; a sense of hard-hit communitie…